Australian Tradition: Thursdays Special

Australia is  a multicultural country and our traditions have in the past tended to come from the country of our origin. We used to celebrate with our Swedish friends on Christmas Eve feasting on gravlax and Swedish meatballs. We drank a lot of schnapps washed down with a beer chaser after singing Swedish drinking songs such as Helan Gar. For me this is an English/Scottish heritage and a tradition is a family gathering for a huge feast of turkey at lunch time on Christmas Day.

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© irene waters 2017

For my family which has an English/Scottish heritage we traditionally had a family gathering with a huge feast of turkey, ham and Christmas Pudding at lunch time on Christmas Day.

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© irene waters 2017

Santa of course always has found us in Australia.

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© irene waters 2017

In the last ten years Australia has developed its own identity and although there are many who still follow the traditions of the country of their forebears there are increasingly more people joining the throngs of people what is quickly becoming an Aussie tradition.

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© irene waters 2017

This includes prawns for lunch on Christmas Day either chilled or thrown on the barbie.

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© irene waters 2017

Because it is summer many people spend the day at the beach

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© irene waters 2017

or where that is not possible towels cooled in the freezer are draped around necks in the effort to cool down. We now even have our own Christmas carols and Christmas Songs.

In response to Paula’s prompt

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. I followed this by doing a Master of Arts by research graduating in 2017. Now I live to write and write to live.
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17 Responses to Australian Tradition: Thursdays Special

  1. eklastic says:

    I’ve lived in South Africa for quite a few years so your Christmas traditions strike a chord. As much as I like the candles and lights and dark hours of this time of year in the northern hemisphere part of me misses the outdoor fun atmosphere of a southern festive season.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. ksbeth says:

    so interesting – i spent a christmas there after my daughter married an aussie and it was exactly as you described )

    Liked by 1 person

  3. In Southern California and in much of the Southwest, the weather is very similar to Australia’s, even though December is winter here in the States. But most folks cling to the snowy wintry idea of Christmas, with sleighs and other snow scenes on their lawns. Still, some like Santa surfing or hanging out at the beach. My favorite of your photos is Santa with your very well behaved dogs. No coal in their stockings this year! They’ve earned their treats.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think ours has changed as our demographics have changed and not so many people see it as a celebration of Christ’s birth. Over 30% of Australians claim they have no religion and just under 20% something other than Christianity so the beach is probably what for half the population is just a good excuse for a holiday. Absolutely re dogs. That was last years Santa photo – they are off tomorrow to visit the man in red who is coming to our vet in the morning.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Paula says:

    Beautiful traditions, Irene despite the heat.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Charli Mills says:

    Christmas prawns! We must be Australian because it’s the one time of year I fix them. We might even put them on the barbie if I can knock off enough snow. Enjoyed this post, Irene!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Heyjude says:

    Nothing like a BBQ (or braai as they are known in SA) along with fresh salads and a cold beer in the southern hemisphere, but here in the north you need something to keep you warm inside – though I have long gone off the tradition of spending hours slaving over a hot stove! I’d sooner spend the day on the beach (one of yours preferably). Have a good Christmas and 2018 Irene.
    Jude xx

    Liked by 2 people

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