Floral Friday: An Aussie Country garden

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Earlyn country garden is the type of place you discover when you have your sister-in-law and her husband visiting from Germany. Unlike our visits to their town where there are all manner of walks close-by, the miles between places in Australia (and they were walking) was long. We were a long walk from town and they were itching to get out. We had done all of our normal tourist trips and had discovered when we invited them to go out for a coffee that the three quarter of an hour trip to the coffee shop was beyond their comprehension. Discovering Earlyn country Gardens only a fifteen minute drive away was a delightful surprise.

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Earlyn was named after the gardener’s mother Lyn and her husband Earl. It was the home garden of a large cattle property, fenced off from the beasts and kangaroos but having a wonderful backdrop of the hills and scrub country on which the cattle grazed. You can see as you wander around the garden on the slide show above the amount of love and care that went into this little piece of paradise. The flowers were magnificent. I went home with cuttings all of which took. After a good wander we sat down in the breezeway  where a scrumptious light lunch was served.

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

It’s a place I would recommend if you ever found yourself in Gloucester for several days. A good Australian country garden.

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. I followed this by doing a Master of Arts by research graduating in 2017. Now I live to write and write to live.
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27 Responses to Floral Friday: An Aussie Country garden

  1. andy1076 says:

    I can only see the first shot with my phone, but wow what a sight 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I can see the whole series. Beautiful. Glad to see agapanthus and abutalon. Hope the spelling is correct.!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. noelleg44 says:

    Charming garden, but I can see the vast spaces beyond! At least you can walk – here you drive or get run over!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. TanGental says:

    you do make our winter doubly hard, you know. I love the garden and to think it is in Gloucester! Splendid. It’ funny t wonder at the species; taken at a glance this could easily be a classic English cottage garden with deep herbaceous borders but I’m guessing the overlap in species would not be that great. ?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Traditional English gardens are common here because of our history. The settlers brought out the plants from the “old country” that they loved and tried to replicate the gardens. It would have been hard work in many instances but often successful. Funnily Australian native gardens tend to do well for a number of years and then just drop dead. Landscapers prefer to use the exotics (imported from elsewhere) species.

      Liked by 2 people

      • TanGental says:

        how many have become invasive species I wonder. Throughout my time in NZ we were reminded of the British obsession with importing things because ‘we knew best’ whether it was wildlife of plants with dire results.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Many have become invasive species but I think they imported them to feel at home rather than because they knew best. Roger finds our bush very untidy and has always tried to make our farms like an English estate – I think because it fitted in with his recollections of gardens of his childhood. The results, though, in some instances have been dire.

        Liked by 1 person

      • TanGental says:

        Nah, you’re just being kind. it was arrogance pure and simple!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. How peaceful and lovely. I have the vista of the hills, but not that beautiful garden.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Behind the Story says:

    A beautiful garden with a glimpse of the surrounding hills. Here in Seattle, the sky is overcast and the branches bare, so the bright colors in your photos are most welcome.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Funny how it takes visitors to make locals discover places in their proverbial backyards. I’ve come across many people who live in tourist destinations but have never visited the places tourist visit. For instance, some people in Cape Town have never been to the top of Table Mountain. The garden is just so uplifting to see 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Such a beautiful garden. Lovely photos. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Charli Mills says:

    Visitors are a great opportunity to explore local gems. Or what we call “stay-cations.” A vacation at home! Beautiful place!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. bkpyett says:

    Lovely slide show showing the gardens Irene!

    Liked by 1 person

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