Weekly Photo Challenge: Angular

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

(9 photos) Angular- the weekly photo challenge asks  us to show “what angular means to you.”  What angle would I take for this challenge? This was easy I thought – I love buildings with their roofs showing different angles. I started scrolling the archives and came across these mining structures take at Delpratt’s mine in Broken Hill. They demonstrate angles of all sizes 90 degrees, 45 degree. I changed my mind and decided scaffolding would be my focus.

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

However, I could not find those wonderful bamboo scaffolds that are common in Asia but in my search I came across the farmhouse we lived in at Bucca Wauka. An English cabinet-maker  built the house which featured wood and angles both inside and out.

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

And yes. The angle of the ladder changed one day and he came off the roof landing on me where I was gardening below. He was lucky he didn’t come off the other side.

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

© irene waters 2014

And though the rounded head pokes through you might think “that isn’t an angle” I can assure you that head has more angles than most I know.

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. I followed this by doing a Master of Arts by research graduating in 2017. Now I live to write and write to live.
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21 Responses to Weekly Photo Challenge: Angular

  1. andy1076 says:

    There’s something about wooden houses like below that really catches my eyes, in the daytime there’s so much ambient lighting and in the night so cozy 🙂

    Like

  2. Love the scaffolding and ruins photo!

    Ack! Sorry about the ladder incident. 😀 His head has more angles than most you know…

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Great interpretation of angular! And I am in love with the timber interior of the house! Gorgeous!!

    Like

  4. What a gorgeous house and spectacular view. How could you leave?

    Like

  5. Sherri says:

    What a beautiful home you had Irene, oh and those views! Love your last line about ‘angles’ of a different kind 😉 And thank goodness the cabinet maker fell the right side, if he was to fall at all. Phew… o_O

    Like

  6. Charli Mills says:

    Old mining equipment is often found in remote and empty places in the west. The angular structure makes it seem so modern and important, yet so oddly abandoned to wild spaces. Yikes! Catching a husband in the garden would be unfortunate! Glad you both survived! 🙂

    Like

    • I imagine you have a lot of these scattered around your abandoned gold fields of the west. Broken Hill is still operating, predominantly though silver, lead and zinc. This shaft is tourist purposes only. But they have, for me a beauty.
      I don’t recommend the human form as a substitute ball. 🙂

      Like

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