Flying Fingers: 99 word Flash Fiction

The girl giggled. The babysitter’s fingers acted the songs he sang, flying before landing suddenly on the bed beside the child. They tweaked her nose before flying upwards. Rosalind laughed, clapping her hands. Down came the fingers landing on the rabbit adorning her nightdress. They lingered, tracing the bunny’s outline on Rosalind’s chest before flying into the air to dance. Down they came touching her arms lightly before flying up to the sky again. Rosalind shrieked gleefully. Quickly the fingers pounced, on her tummy,  walking  lower and lower.

“John. We’re home.”

“Next time sweetie.” John promised Rosalind  before leaving.

In response to Charli’s prompt where she asks:

March 29, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about fingers that fly. Think about the different ways we use our fingers and what happens when we add speed. Go where the prompt leads.

Respond by April 3, 2018. Use the comment section below to share, read and be social. You may leave a link, pingback or story in the comments.

If you want your story published in the weekly collection, please use this form. If you want to interact with other writers, do so in the comments (yes, that means sharing your story TWICE — once for interaction and once for publication). Rules are here.

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. I followed this by doing a Master of Arts by research graduating in 2017. Now I live to write and write to live.
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41 Responses to Flying Fingers: 99 word Flash Fiction

  1. lisarey1990 says:

    Brilliantly written.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. This is so creepy. Yes, very well written, the tension coming from the child’s absolute innocence and delight in his “game”. So creepy. I am very relieved that they came home and that you were at 99 words.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Reena Saxena says:

    Chilling! Should kids be left with babysitters of the opposite sex?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks Reena. Often it is a family member who is trusted. Most who prey on children come from within the family or are friends of the family, Otherwise I agree – I think you’d have to think twice about leaving a small girl with a male babysitter. A sad indictment of our society as most males would not contemplate harming a girl in this manner.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Juliet says:

    Oooh. I just kept saying oooh and squirming in my seat as I read this. Brilliant but awful.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Ooooh, Irene, this is very creepy.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Charli Mills says:

    What you managed to convey is how innocent a child is when groomed by a sexual predator. It definitely makes the reader squirm, but more importantly, think and be more aware of what to look for or be more suspicious.You wrote this one well.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Norah says:

    I was so enjoying the childhood game and laughter, Irene. And then he ruined it. So pleased the parents arrived in time. I wish Rosalind could tell them what mischief John was up to. Sadly, they will probably have no idea until the damage is done. I don’t think we should judge all men by those few who prey upon innocent children. Not all men are bad.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Annecdotist says:

    Wow, Irene, I had to read this a second time to check the creepiness wasn’t only in my head. A horrible story, all too credible, perfectly handled.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Pingback: Flying Fingers « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

  10. floridaborne says:

    Of all the 99 word stories I just read, this one struck at my heart. I’ve been that little girl.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sorry you’ve had that experience. It must be hard to come to terms knowing that someone we trusted could take advantage in that way. Sending hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

      • floridaborne says:

        Some day, I might write about it. Did you know it is estimated that 1 out of every 4 girls has had a similar experience?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I used to work in intensive care and we went through a period of six months or more when we had so many admissions that stemmed from a history of sexual abuse in childhoood that it seemed to be more normal than not to have been inappropriately touched (I didn’t know the exact statistics). I can remember ringing my Father and thanking him for not having done so to me. That showed me just how much difficulty many have years later after such actions. I hope you have dealt with your experiences in a way that has allowed you to move on happily in life. When (if) you write about it make sure you do it in a safe environment for yourself with someone who can help you through it as those memories are going to be hard to relive.

        Liked by 1 person

      • floridaborne says:

        It took years, I’ve worked through it. What is so hard for people to understand is that whether or not there was physical pain, it warps a child’s entire preception of what a relationship is supposed to be. I had a great father, it was other men in the community that people trusted who weren’t so great.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m glad you’ve worked through it but I understand what you mean about it affecting you perceptions but unless you have been through it the full enormity probably can’t fully be understood. Men of trust – we have basically lost our trust in those we look to for role models such as police, church, politicians and teachers. I just hope it doesn’t take away the fabric of society that makes us human.

        Liked by 1 person

      • floridaborne says:

        Some days I believe it IS the fabrick of humanity. There are few people who, given a little power, don’t abuse it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I agree. I often have discussions re corruption that I like to think that I would maintain my integrity and not be corruptible but how do you know? I have never been in a position where anyone wants to corrupt me — would I be any different to all the rest. I simply don’t know. I would like to think I would. In days gone by we were able to look up to people as role models – were they always corrupt? Probably but we didn’t know it. Sexual predation by those that are in positions of trust is simply unforgiveable.

        Liked by 1 person

      • floridaborne says:

        That, I agree with entirely. Recidivism rate is so close to 100% it’s no joke. We need to be rid of sexual predators so they never have a chance to do it to again, especially child again.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Jules says:

    Oh…the ominous tones that play…
    when trust misplaced allow fingers to lay
    too close to innocent hearts.

    Liked by 1 person

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