An Australian’s Perspective of Vernal in Europe: Thursday’s Special

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© irene waters 2017

Melting Snows

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© irene waters 2017

Spring brings life

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© irene waters 2017

From the succulent lush new shoots of grass,

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© irene waters 2017

emerging blooms and shoots on trees

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© irene waters 2017

but for an Australian in Europe in the Spring joy is to be had in being able to visit tourist hot spots such as the Pont d’Avignon which attracts over 300,000 people per year and find you are almost the only person there

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© irene waters 2017

As in other towns whose incomes rely on tourism

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And the Ardeche where it is too cold in the water to attract any but the most hardy.

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© irene waters 2017

Camping grounds, if open, you may find you are the only campers there and the pool a place that for this vernal time affords the luxury of privacy.

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© irene waters 2017

Spring in Greenland with the thawing of the snow means the dogs can no longer work

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© irene waters 2017

And an unexpected spring effect was finding that many burials take place as they have been held over til the ground is soft enough to dig.

For these reasons early to late Spring is in my opinion the best time to visit Europe

In response to Paula’s vernal prompt  

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. Commenced a masters by research in 2014.
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8 Responses to An Australian’s Perspective of Vernal in Europe: Thursday’s Special

  1. Pingback: THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: VERNAL | Lost in Translation

  2. Paula says:

    Your entries keep inspiring. Thank you very much Irene 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a wonderful article this is – thanks for the trip to Europe today.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Charli Mills says:

    Interesting journey and perspective. I’m curious where they store the bodies awaiting burial? In the pioneer days, often a body was kept in a snow drift until spring thaw.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think it would be the same here. There was no refrigeration. They had caught a whale which was just kept in the village square for several days for the entire village to feast upon. Unless they had a shed we didn’t see I think that a snow drift was the logical place.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Charli Mills says:

        Sounds similar to the culture on Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic. Meat from hunting seals and caribou or fishing is kept frozen and at community events it’s shared semi-frozen on tarps. But the bodies, not sure where those are kept!

        Liked by 1 person

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