Seascape: Thursday’s Special

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© irene waters 2016

Sitting, reflecting on seascapes of the world

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© irene waters 2015

Brrrrrrrrr…… so uninviting other than to the eye

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© irene waters 2016

Yippee………wave caught so exhilarating

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© irene waters 2015

Hot, bothered China Beach gives small respite

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© irene waters 2015

yet wandering on rocky coastlands tranquility is found

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© irene waters 2015

and perhaps a sighting of one that is at home in the sea no matter what the weather.

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© irene waters 2015

Not so at home the ship is run aground as the sea shows off its force.

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© irene waters 2015

It’s colour changes from deepest blue

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© irene waters 2014

to bluey green

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© irene waters 2014

to green

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© irene waters 2014

and back to tropical blue

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© irene waters 2014

but sadly in some parts floating particles and general filth give colour that is abhorrent and should you swim, don’t open your mouth lest it fill with slime and stuff like porridge.

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© irene waters 2015

But as the sun goes down my reflection ends as I think on Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s words:

“My soul is full of longing
for the secret of the sea,
and the heart of the great ocean
sends a thrilling pulse through me.”

In response to Paula’s Thursday’s Special.

 

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. Commenced a masters by research in 2014.
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11 Responses to Seascape: Thursday’s Special

  1. Paula says:

    They are so beautiful! Is it ok if I include the 3rd one from the bottom for the next poll?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Thursday’s Special: Seascape | Lost in Translation

  3. My husband has told me a lot about China Beach from when he served in Viet Nam. He always thought it was the most beautiful country but hated the Marine Corps and hated the war.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I can understand that. I only know of China Beach from MASH. I don’t know about the States but our serviceman from that war were treated abysmally on their return to Australia.

      Liked by 1 person

      • It was the same in the States. Most of the returning servicemen were made to feel like monsters and were humiliated by most of the home population. Since we had a haphazardly implemented draft at the time, the men who were forced to serve were often from very poor families. Wealthier families who could afford to send their sons to college also got their sons deferred from military obligation. My husband’s father had died very young, he wasn’t the only son, and his mother was barely able to pay basic bills. She couldn’t afford to put her son through college. My husband (we hadn’t met yet) had a low draft number and no way of getting a deferment. So he enlisted rather than be forced into service and not be able to choose which branch to go into. When he came home, he had a tough time, like all the returning men (and women, most of whom had been nurses – you can relate to that.) Although I was an active Vietnam war protester, I separated the men forced to serve from the complex political situation that got us embroiled in the war. When I met my husband, back from Nam a year or so, I saw a wonderful man who’d struggled with many difficult issues though he was still very young. I’m proud of him – he’s a hero as much as anyone who serves in their country’s military.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I feel for your husband and he is a hero. Like you I protested the war but separated out those doing what they were ordered to do from the policy makers that decided that they should be there. Our returned serviceman’s league however treated them poorly and refused to acknowledge their service. Just shameful.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve been meaning to ask if you learned to surf as a kid, or did you start later? I’m impressed that you surf. Me, I dangle my toes in the ocean at the edge of the sand. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • My Father started me off when I was a kid with the basics but teens to thirties were my peak, but I did body board surfing. The girl on the board wasn’t me but a total stranger that I took with a zoom lens. I no longer have the confidence that I once had as I am not as strong a swimmer as I once was. Now I am happy to swim between the flags or wriggle my toes like yourself.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Charli Mills says:

    A thrilling pulse, indeed. I’m not familiar with seascapes so much and enjoy your knowledgeable insights.

    Liked by 1 person

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