Turbidity on the Mekong: Thursday’s Special

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© irene waters 2016

The river snakes 

A lifeline to millions

Their fate dependent on its waters

For fish and food

Construction, summer rains carry sediment

From Tibet through China, Burma, Laos and Cambodia

Until finally, in Vietnam, it heads to sea 

through  a turbid Mekong Delta 

where people fish and eat

then wash and pee.

 

In response to Paula’s Thursday’s Special

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. Commenced a masters by research in 2014.
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17 Responses to Turbidity on the Mekong: Thursday’s Special

  1. Paula says:

    🙂 I read your poem three times. Thank you, Irene for this series of photos with your accompaniment in verses. They are all powerful, documentary photos, and many will agree with me and say how outstanding the last one is.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Thursday’s Special: Pick a Word | Lost in Translation

  3. restlessjo says:

    Definitely turgid waters, and I too love that last shot. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. DailyMusings says:

    The last photo gave me pause as it speaks so much. Thank you for sharing these images and words

    Liked by 1 person

  5. A great poem, Irene. Terse, focused, and with a powerful message. And the images carry their own weight as well. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Water – so essential for life and yet this water looks like churned mud. I’d be afraid to put my toe in it. What contrast to those of us, me included, who go everywhere with our bottles of clean, purchased water.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. klara says:

    powerful! both images and poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Pingback: Turbidity on the Mekong: Thursday’s Special — Reflections and Nightmares- Irene A Waters (writer and memoirist) – Welcome to the World of Ekasringa Avatar!

  9. Heyjude says:

    I love your poems. This is a very powerful one. I wouldn’t want to wash or drink that water! We are so lucky to have clean water, but I do feel guilty at using it to flush the loo!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Jude. I have never thought of myself as a poet but must admit that it is a medium that can express what you want to say in a more noticeable fashion. We are very lucky to have clean water and where we are any new dwelling has to have a rainwater tank to use for things like toilets. We had a holiday in Germany with my husband’s sister and they were obviously suffering drought at the time as she had a bucket for emptying bathwater to use in the flushing of the toilets.

      Liked by 1 person

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