Reflecting on Childhood Meal Favourites: Times Past

1971.18 At Artarmon

© irene waters 2016

Last month’s topic proved a tough one and not one that was readily approached by many. If I caused distress to you by this topic I apologise as that was not my intention. It was however a topic that should be talked about. Corporal punishment still exists in places and I had hoped to discover ways that discipline was served without resorting to straps, paddles and ferulas for I believe all children do need to be disciplined at times. There was certainly a difference in generations with the baby boomers being the largest respondents and all can remember corporal punishment. Other punishment was the soapy water mouthwash. There did not seem much difference between the treatment of boys or girls or indeed by the countries or region one lived. However, the response rate was far too small to draw any conclusions. One interesting observation however, is that this post obtained a staggering 287 views, most referred by a UK site network54 who have their own thread going on the subject.

Now on to this month’s topic – Your favourite childhood meal and what would you think if you were served it today.

What were your favourites?

Would you still like them today? If not why not?

Was your favourite served as a normal meal or only on special or rare occasions?

Did your mother enjoy cooking?

Did you serve the same favourite to your own children? If so, did it become his/her favourite as well?

For understanding the purpose of these prompts and for instructions for taking part please visit Times Past. I hope you have more pleasant memories with this prompt and I hope to be able to see similarities between regions and a difference between generations. Please don’t forget to say which generation you belong to and country of childhood and city or rural.

Baby Boomers

Australia Rural

For my mother cooking was a chore she had to do. It was an expectation of women that they were good cooks and provided their families with wonderful meals. There was no questioning that some foods weren’t good for you. We ate the lot. I hated it but the rest of the family loved bread and dripping sandwiches, bread fried in lard and offle. Most of our meals were meat and three veg (a green, orange and white which usually translated to beans or peas, carrots and potato). Mostly our meals were fairly uninspired. My favourite meal before the age of 12 was most definitely the left overs we had on Sunday night. Our main meal on Sunday was always a roast served after church at lunchtime. That night we would have the left over meat battered and fried as fritters and the real treat were the corn fritters Mum made to serve with them. I still drool at the thought of them. I have tried to replicate the fritters and have never been successful. Most that I have made have been nothing but stodge. I am convinced that if I were to be given fritters like Mum used to make I’d still think I’d gone to heaven and back.

Having a sweet tooth I had two favourite desserts. One was lemon sago and the other was blanc mange over red arrowroot jelly. I haven’t had either of these for years but again I think I’d still love them. Unfortunately the thought of any of these dishes turns my husband’s stomach and as he does the cooking they are never created.

German Heritage 

https://irisgreenwald.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/reflecting-on-childhood-meal-favourites-times-past/

U.S. A. city

https://julesinflashyfiction.wordpress.com/2016/06/22/nf-childhood-food-memories-food-glorious-food-6-22/

England City

My Sandwich Generation And The Song Of The Summerhouse

Baby Busters

Rural USA

https://mcclendonvilla.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/reflecting-on-childhood-meal-favourites-times-past/

 

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. Commenced a masters by research in 2014.
This entry was posted in Daily Post prompt and challenges, Memoir, Past Challenge, photography, Times Past and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

58 Responses to Reflecting on Childhood Meal Favourites: Times Past

  1. Luanne says:

    When I was really little my favorite meal was (calves) liver and onion and canned mandarin oranges for dessert. No judging, please hah. As far as corporal punishment goes, I think there is a problem with how much emotion to deliver it with, no matter what your opinion of cp is. For instance, too much emotion and it’s not about punishment, but about the emotions of the discipliner. Too little emotion, and that is absolutely terrifying and could produce a sociopath.

    Liked by 1 person

    • One of my husband’s favourite meals from his childhood and still today is calves liver. He will argue with anyone that calves liver is the only liver worth eating and lambs fry is not worth cooking. I have a can of mandarins in my cupboard bought because of memories of a dish Mum made with coconut, mandarins and I think sour cream. She used to serve it as a salad but to me it was a great desert. So no, you won’t get any judging from me. I think that is a good point you make about corporal punishment. Any cp I received I think was given in good faith and didn’t go over the top. I can remember someone saying on numerous occasions this is going to hurt me more than it will hurt you. I think it probably did too.

      Like

  2. Dahlia says:

    Nobody cooks like Mom and at eighty, it still holds true 🙂 I used to hate lunch as a child mostly because it was rice based (which seemed to expand into an insurmountable heap after a point of time and mom would never let us leave the table until we had finished it). Dinner was flour based (and countable!). After we went to the hostel, even rice at home was a treat – thanks for the memories 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Wow – your Mum is still the best cook. Are you a baby boomer? Rice was a rareity when I was growing up. A Chinese restaurant came to my town when I was probably 10 or 11 and that was really the only time I saw rice. My Mum went to a cooking course a year or two later and came home cooking kedgeree which has rice in it and in my later teens it became more common. Glad to give you memories – you have given me some in return.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Dahlia says:

        I am from India and parts of it are rice consumers parts wheat – since my parents moved from the rice lands to the wheat land – we had one meal of each 🙂 Fact is I am not much of a cook 😉

        Liked by 2 people

      • That is interesting. I didn’t realise that part of India consumed rice and not the other. I don’t know whether in India you are expected to be a good cook but here there is a growing number of men who cook and women who don’t. I am one of them.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Dahlia says:

        Yes, the eastern and southern parts are primarily rice growers and consumers while the northern plains are primarily wheat growers. Here too many men cook -as a hobby but not as a daily responsibility.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Yes, this is a much more fun topic, Irene. The photo of your family is lovely.

    I was a fussy eater as a kid and wish I’d remained so. I didn’t like much of anything healthy and was a skinny child. Hated mashed potatoes, jello, pudding, eggs, hard dabs of butter on my toast, or the tiniest bit of fat on any meat. My mom was not a good cook, disliked the task, and made a screaming nightmare of preparation of every meal. It wasn’t until I was married that I found that beans and peas did not actually come from cans, that one could buy them fresh. We did make salads: head lettuce, tomatoes, celery, cucumbers, and dressing. Sometimes added canned black olives. My mom’s basic menu repertoire: spaghetti and meatballs; steak and canned green beans; roasted chicken and canned green beans. Lunch, when she remembered to give me something for lunch, was peanut butter and jelly on dried out bread. We got to drop a Hershey’s kiss into our chocolate milk and that’s the way I liked milk.

    I loved dessert, especially chocolate. My favorite treat was to stop at Perry’s Mom and Pop store on the way to school, and for a dime, buy a package of Tastykakes chocolate cupcakes. These were packaged two together in waxed paper, and had a soft chocolate frosting on a chocolate cake. Other packaged cakes were nothing like them and I still love the Tastykakes brand and dislike everything that’s “similar.” The company made several other flavors as well, all genuinely good. Tastykake was an Eastern company, and despite several attempts to bring it to the West Coast, it was never successful. We used to ask our East Coast family to bring us our favorite Tastykake treats when they came to visit. About 5 years ago, the company merged with another bakery and I’ve noticed that the “new” chocolate cupcake now tastes just like the famous competitor’s brand that I’ve always disliked. Ugh.

    As an adult I learned to cook, and tried very hard to prepare healthy meals for my two sons. Neither appreciated my efforts and both, now adults, are much better cooks than I ever was. My favorite thing now is to have dinner with our family, our older son bringing over his wife and kids and sometimes extended family. Our younger son’s family lives too far and we rarely see them, so the shared meals don’t happen, and that’s my biggest food and family regret. (Oh, and I should seriously lose weight. Much as I love them, don’t send Tastykakes.)

    I think the best thing about any meal is the social aspect of it. Eating crackers and cheese is wonderful if you’re with people you love. Breaking bread has a religious component and saying a blessing before a meal reminds us how very fortunate we are to have food, family, and friends.

    Have taken way too much of your blog, Irene, so sorry.

    Liked by 4 people

    • I loved reading your food memoir Sharon and space is not a problem. Tastykake — I just hate it when something is good and they decide it has to be altered. Such a pity when you liked something so much. We of course did not have them here and as a child we saw few packaged treats. Although our beans and peas were fresh they were our staple veg as well. As soon as a frozen variety became available my mother converted to them which I was happy about because I always had the job of stringing the beans. Funny how men are becoming better cooks. I wonder if for a man it was not expected that they help out in the food preparation as a child and the mothers dislike of cooking didn’t therefore rub off on them to the same extent that I picked up – women’s drudge work. I didn’ft become a good cook either. In fact I don’t cook. The men had the luxury of it being a fun thing they wanted to do.
      You are absolutely right – it doesn’t matter what you eat when you are with people you love. Gravitating to the kitchen is the new social area and then sitting and sharing food is wonderful. Thank you Sharon for making that point as it is important. I’ve always insisted that we sit at the dining room table for dinner as I believe that this is where conversation is had rather than being mindless in front of the television.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Pingback: Reflecting on Childhood Meal Favourites: Times Past — Reflections and Nightmares- Irene A Waters (writer and memoirist) – Welcome to the World of Ekasringa Avatar!

  5. Norah says:

    Interesting post, Irene. I know most of your memoir posts are still sitting in my inbox waiting for me to dig that far back in. It all takes time. But I’m pleased I read this one. I often marvel at my Mum’s cooking ability. There were twelve of us in all, ten kids. I remember very few take-aways and even fewer meals out. Mum spent most of her days busy with housework, much of it cooking. The cake and biscuits tins were always filled for the hungry hoards arriving home from school, and emptied by tea time.
    Meat and 3 vege, as you say, was common. We often had macaroni cheese on a Friday night, and Sunday roast at lunch time. For tea on Sundays we’d have “bread and duck under the table”, and sometimes it wasn’t much more than that. Dad liked to fish and often caught a good supply which kept us going for a while.
    When my little family (there’s 8 of us now: 2 children, 2 partners, 2 grandchildren, Hub and me) gets together of a weekend, I am often exhausted preparing the meal (that is a slight exaggeration!) but then I think of my Mum doing it every day, for more, without a break, day after day, year after year. People always marveled at her ability to be able to put enough food on the table for extra or unexpected guests. No one was ever turned away or went hungry. There were not the frozen vegies and meals like there are now, or the convenience (or affordability) of takeaways. How she did it, I’ll never know. If I can find an excuse to not cook, I’ll take it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I can’t imagine cooking for 12 every night. you would certainly have to have a routine. Did you all sit at the table? Talking or in silence? I imagine that with that many meal times would be a fun affair. Apart from the macaroni I don’t think there was much difference between your meals and ours except that we didn’t have your Dad so rarely ate fish and Mum rarely baked cakes.
      I am lucky for like you I take any excuse not to cook and as Roger doesn’t want to eat my offerings I have an excuse every night. Thanks for adding your experiences.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Norah says:

        We all did sit at the table. It was a large dining table anyway, a beautiful timber (maybe oak, I can’t remember) table to which Dad added two extensions to fit more around it. For many years there were either one or two high chairs at the table too, and as soon as Mum had her youngest out of the high chairs, the grandkids started filling them. I think we talked (or squabbled) though we ate quickly to make sure we didn’t let anyone else get it before we did!
        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • That is a beautiful picture of a family dinner Norah. We ate quickly as well – I am told it is because I would eat anything that everyone else had to eat quickly in order to get the food that was on their plate without me taking it. I find that hard to believe although my mother says that before I came along my brother was a difficult feeder.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Norah says:

        That’s an interesting benefit of a little sister – turning a difficult feeder into an eager eater! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Sherri says:

    Catching up here with you Irene, I let the punishment post slide by me, completely lost track of time with struggling to blog at the moment. Fascinating that you had so many views for your post, just shows what a chord it struck and I agree, I think it is a subject that needs to be talked about and you were very brave to ask it. Now for this one, I think you’ll have a great response and I very much look forward to reading the responses. I love your family photo 🙂 I really will do my best to get my post out in time for this one. And as for the bread and dripping, it was my mother’s favourite as a girl growing up in war time Britain, but I wasn’t subject to it thank goodness. I remember blancmange too…it was always pink I seem to remember. I have to say I’m with Roger on this one, but I loved jelly! Interesting this as I am writing about my exposure to American food in my memoir, how I first discovered that jelly is called ‘Jello’ there. But I could go on. Loved reading about your childhood mealtimes Irene…I’ll be back, I really will try! 🙂 ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Sherri and if you make it back will love to see you but if not you are forgiven. I know you have a lot going on at the moment. If your blanc mange was red you probably also had it with arrowroot jelly with a drop of cochineal. We had a brand of jelly called aeroplane jelly which we just loved. It was my father’s job to make it and he turned it into a real science to make sure that he didn’t end up with a hard skin on it. He would be horrified at how Roger does it with no detrimental effects. Takes quarter the time and just as nice. I bet there are a lot of differences in names of foods between the States and England. I think like in most word usage Australia followed England whereas America went its own way. ❤ 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        I’ve never heard of areoplane jelly! Ha…yes, your poor dad…Roger is quite the cook it seems! But I remember that skin on blancmange – I think! Ha…there goes that memory lol 😀 Ours was usually pink rather than red. Which reminds me of a revolting school pudding. It had a thick pastry base, topped with a layer of pink blancmange and dessicated coconut. It actually made me gag, and I will eat anything – except dessicated coconut and rhubarb :0 I remember too that while all my school friends knew what they were having for ‘tea’ each evening, I never did. Mum was not one for routine in that way. I remember telling my friends that we had had lasagna for dinner one night and nobody else had heard of it! Imagine that in today’s world. Ha…yes, I had some funny adventures with American food terms, I have wanted to blog about it for ages but never have. For one thing, a simple thing like what we call cornflour they call cornstarch. Took me a while to figure that out! Thanks for understanding Irene…I’ll do my best, and may just surprise you lol 🙂 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • Aeroplane jelly is the brand and I can still sing the advertisement for it. Believe it or not Sherri when Mum moved into her retirement village and lasagne was on the menu the old ladies she sat with in the dining room had no idea what it was. She had to explain it to them. They reciprocated when cheerios were on the menu. These turned out to be what we call cocktail frankfurts or little boys if you were in certain company. The American food differences would be interesting as would be the differences in language generally. I love being surprised. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        Ha! That is a surprise about the lasagne! And cheerios I know as a cereal! So another surprise there too! My next post up will be for this challenge, I am determined if nothing else!!! 🙂 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • Will look forward to it Sherri but don’t stress if life and memoir get in the way. I can’t believe how quickly the months go by. 🙂 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        Thanks Irene…and yes, way too fast! Reeling a bit from the referendum vote here. I am putting a post together. I’m going to be signing off for the summer (I have to, I can’t get the memoir done otherwise, I’ve hit a wall…) but I really wanted to do this challenge first, I’m determined if nothing else!! 🙂 ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • Roger is thrilled with the result. He had been saying from the outset that the vote would be to leave so he wasn’t surprised. He doesn’t believe that it is disastrous and that the media are making a picnic out of it. A bit like they did with the millenium bug which didn’t happen. For him, England losing to Iceland is much more disastrous.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        Ha…yes, a lot of people are thrilled with Leave. I am not in the same camp because it is the cracks beneath the surface of our society that worry me the most, the generational divide. It’s been like this for a long while, but Brexit has pushed it to the surface. It is painful and I hope my post reflects that but from the point of view of my grown children’s generation and that of mine, as baby boomers totally squeezed. It is the lack of good leadership that is so worrying. I do despair of my country, I’ll be honest. But I also have faith that we’ll turn this around and be the better for it. One day. As for the football, I can’t be doing with it. We’re crap!!!!!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think England has always had a generational divide. Just think of the parents of those that followed the Beatles and Rolling Stones. The Mods and the Rockers and their parents just didn’t get it. I take it that the youth want to stay in because they know no other England. The older generations want out because they do. I think this may be the catalyst to have the discussion on what kind of England you want. Is economy everything. I wish we could have that discussion here but all we ever here is economy. I heard an interview with Bobby Charlton where he was asked if he and his team were playing iceland at the world cup what does he think the score would have been. He said England 1 Iceland 0. The reporter said only 1:0. Yes he said, you have to remember most of us are now in our mid 70s. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        That’s a great reply from Bobby Charlton, and the only time we were any good at football, back in the 60s when we won the World Cup!! I was just a kid but I remember the Charlton’s and George Best very well. And yes, I agree, I wish everything didn’t always come down to the economy. I remember when Clinton was in power and that whole Monica Lewinsky ‘thing’, and I wonder how things would have gone for him if the economy had been bad at the time, but as it was, it was good and people’s pockets were well lined in the 90s. Great chatting with you Irene. I look forward to catching up with you here in September, I will miss your posts though. Will be in touch elsewhere…get those walking boots on my friend! 🙂 ❤ xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

      • Enjoy your break Sherri although you’re missed. Nice that we can catch up on FB and email. ❤ 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        Miss you my dear friend…hope all is well…will message soon… ❤ ❤ ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • Missing you too Sherri. I have had foot surgery and am finding I am not getting to the computer as much as anticipated despite being able to do next to nothing. Doing nothing takes so long when you can only hobble. Hope your life is getting back on a more even keel. Look forward to talking soon.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sherri says:

        Oh no, so sorry to hear that dear Irene…I have been thinking about you a lot and wondering how things are going with you. I hope you’re recovering well and will soon be able to do a little more despite the hobble. So frustrating though. Hopefully you’re getting a lot of reading time in at least. I’ll be in touch, and yes, we’ll talk soon my dear friend. Meanwhile I’m sending you lots of love and big, healing hugs…and we’ll walk again when you can get your boots back on… ❤ ❤ ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • It could be some time before the boots are on Sherri. I will send you a message to catch up properly. Been missing you but I know you have a lot on your plate. Hope all is okay.

        Like

      • Sherri says:

        I’m so sorry this has happened to you Irene, I hope you’re okay. Miss you lots. Messaging.. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’m okay Sherri. Just can’t manage to sit at the computer for long these days and here I was thinking I’d do nothing but. Will look out for your message. Hope all is well and miss you too.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. colinmathers says:

    We were SO young once! My fondest memory is the Sunday treat of lambs brains in breadcrumbs. I’ve tried several times to buy lambs brains and recreate it, but my boys have made 100% clear they will not touch it if I do. Maybe I’ll just do a treat for myself. I did order them once in a Belgian restaurant and the people I was with had a fit, saying I would get mad cow disease. I must admit, that did make me think twice about buying brains in France. Of course, Switzerland has no mad cow disease, the mad cows simply will not cross the frontier, mad as they are.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Haha. We made a concerted effort to avoid beef in England (I think in 1996 trip) and did very well until our plane was delayed and they gave us a meal voucher. We had Macdonalds with it and didn’t think of the mad cow until it had been consumed. I still like crumbed brains but Roger won’t come at them. I have them occasionally as an entree but they seem to have gone off the menu recently. I agree – they are yummy. I used to like tongue too but I haven’t seen that for years and years.

      Like

  8. Pingback: Weekend Coffee Share: 4th June 2016 | Reflections and Nightmares- Irene A Waters (writer and memoirist)

  9. This is so interesting because I have never really heard of most of these foods.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I. Greenwald says:

    This is a fun set of questions. My mother is a wonderful cook. I am looking forward to her visit in July so that she can make her sauerbraten and potato dumplings. I can make it but not nearly as good as mom. After 30 years of trying to make her lentil dish I finally asked her what I was doing wrong because it never tasted like hers. She asked “did you put a splash of vinegar in?” That was what was missing. Here is the link for my answers to the questions in your challenge;
    https://irisgreenwald.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/reflecting-on-childhood-meal-favourites-times-past/

    Like

    • Iris I loved that you not only had some interesting favourite foods but also had such wonderful photographs to accompany them. I had to smile at you still attempting to get your Mum’s dish right 30 years later. What a wonderful gift for your children — all those recipes. Thanks for joining in.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Pingback: June Blog Challenge: Day 10 | A Texan's View of Upstate New York

  12. Pingback: Reflecting on Childhood Meal Favourites: Times Past | mcclendonvilla

  13. celticmama36 says:

    I am happy to have found your Times Past challenge via the WP Events page. How fun! I have made a post on my page just now with my response. I don’t know exactly how I’m supposed to link here, so here’s my post link.
    https://mcclendonvilla.wordpress.com/2016/06/21/reflecting-on-childhood-meal-favourites-times-past/

    I can’t imagine being married to a man that didn’t want to eat my cooking. That has to be very frustrating. It would be very upsetting to me. When we first got married, I liked to experiment in the kitchen. One night I was trying a new recipe, but didn’t have many of the seasonings called for in the recipe, so I substituted with what I had on hand. New cooks maybe shouldn’t do that, especially to a new husband that is afraid of hurting the new bride’s feelings. 🙂 The recipe was for Herbed Livers (chicken livers). My husband dutifully ate them because he didn’t want to make me cry or discourage me. When finally I was able to sit down to taste them, I found them to be totally disgusting! I asked him why he didn’t tell me they were gross. He said because he didn’t want to hurt my feelings. He was going to eat all that I gave him. We ended up throwing those livers away and went out to eat that night. We still get a big laugh over that one. 🙂

    Have a blessed day!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad you found the challenge on the WP events page.It is great to have a diverse generational representation and from different points on the globe. We lived in the States for a year in the 50s and Mum came back to Australia with an American cookbook which featured the pineapple cake. She was the only person in our country town to make one although as she disliked cooking she didn’t make them too often. I love your husband’s reaction. A great memory to look back on and laugh. I don’t mind my husband not wanting me to cook. For me it is an effort and an all day event whereas for him he seems to do it in the blink of an eye and it is always delicious. Thanks for joining in. Hope that your day is blessed also.

      Liked by 1 person

      • celticmama36 says:

        Did you like the time you spent in the US? While David and I were in college, he had a job lined up for after graduation that would have had us living in Australia. Unfortunately, the job fell through. I was looking forward to being down there, but it just wasn’t meant to be.

        Did any of your neighbors try your mother’s pineapple cake? Did you like it?

        Here is a link to David’s post about my Herb Liver experiment. I hope you enjoy it.
        http://tinyurl.com/herblivers

        I’m glad that your husband likes to cook and is good at it. David is great at cooking popcorn and setting the kitchen on fire. That is really just a running joke here in our house. 🙂 He also has a post about the time the fire department came to our house. If you like, I will share the link to that post, too. Hopefully, WP will let his links come through. Sometimes WP blocks the links as well as the comments they’re in.

        Have a blessed day!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I did enjoy your post and the video you made. Unfortunately my Dad won a scholarship to do his Masters at a University in New York and I was no more than a toddler and my brother, 3 years older has only scattered memories. Of course Mum has told us lots of stories of what we did and I have lots of photographs but no memories of my own. They really enjoyed the experience and met lots of lovely people that they kept in touch with for the rest of their lives. Mum’s cake in our country town went down a treat with anyone who had it. It was very unusual at that time. Please feel welcome to share links and would love to read about the fire men coming.
        Have a good week.

        Liked by 1 person

      • celticmama36 says:

        Thank you. I am glad that you enjoyed David’s post. Here is the URL to his fire department story:
        http://tinyurl.com/jskqt54

        I am glad that your parents enjoyed their time in the US, but sorry that you were too young to remember it. I’ve never been outside of the United States, nor have I ever been out of the Southern states. I’ve never been anywhere and our youngest son is now living in Japan. He is a US Marine. 🙂

        I think it is great that the folks around loved your mama’s cake. Granny never had many leftovers either. 🙂

        Have a blessed week!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks for the link. I enjoyed the laugh.
        I have visited the States once since that time but for a short time only. You have a very big country and I hope one day to get back there.
        Have a blessed week also.

        Liked by 1 person

      • celticmama36 says:

        You’re welcome and thank you for visiting his site. He’s working really hard to get his stories written and recorded so that our kids will have them later. The three strokes he had a month ago really made him feel his mortality.

        Yes, it is a pretty big country, and we live in a really big state, too. Texas is huge and the biggest state that I have ever been in.

        I hope that you’ll be able to come back to the States again some day, too.

        Thank you. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • It is lovely to leave those stories for your children and I can understand how he feels – three strokes would make me feel vulnerable also. He is doing a good job.
        Take care and bless you both 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • celticmama36 says:

        His strokes have made me feel pretty vulnerable, too. We’ll get through it, though.
        Thank you. I’ll tell him you said so. 🙂

        May our Father bless you, too.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I can understand that – not an easy time for either of you. I’ll think of you in my prayers.

        Liked by 1 person

      • celticmama36 says:

        Thank you. We appreciate that very much. Have a blessed day. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Pingback: (nf) childhood food memories/ Food Glorious Food (6.22) | Jules in Flashy Fiction

  15. julespaige says:

    Finally… I’ve been racking my brains, but I just don’t have any good stories. So I just answered the questions.

    (nf) childhood food memories/ Food Glorious Food (6.22)

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Pingback: My Sandwich Generation And The Song Of The Summerhouse | A View From My Summerhouse

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s