Thursday’s Special: Gold Inside

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Ron has asked us to focus on gold inside. His three photos all use natural lighting which he tells us creates gold near sunrise and sunset. I have a dearth of these so only two of mine use natural light. This was the bedroom of our farmhouse and as it was lined with cyprus pine it is almost golden anyway. The difference where the light hits however is even more golden.

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

In Vietnam there is a lot of gold inside buildings particularly in temples.

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Angkor Wat

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Two similarly lit bits of gold – above in the Cu Chi tunnels in Vietnam and below in ancient caves near the Lascaux caves.

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Artificial lighting in churches can create a golden touch as in sitting rooms

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

and in dark corners.

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Some golden ambience over dinner and adding cheer on a cold day in a covered footpath in France.

© irene waters 2015

© irene waters 2015

Thanks to Paula for hosting Thursday’s Special 

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. Commenced a masters by research in 2014.
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20 Responses to Thursday’s Special: Gold Inside

  1. bkpyett says:

    Atmospheric and beautiful, Irene!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Suzanne says:

    Some interesting photos here.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Paula says:

    These are all perfect examples Irene 🙂 Where in France did you shoot this last photo? Your photograph with a lit portrait in a sitting room has made me want to go there. Where did you take it? It looks very appealing and inviting. I’m happy to have you participate. I missed blogging during my holiday.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: Thursday’s Special: Gold inside (response to guest challenge) | Lost in Translation

  5. Pingback: Guest Challenge: Gold Inside | Lost in Translation

  6. Beautiful images. So much variety. Wonderful contribution for the challenge.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. M-R says:

    The Lascaux caves ! – broolyant !!!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. So many ways to see gold. My favorite is the Lascaux Cave as I’ve always wanted to visit.

    Liked by 1 person

    • This wasn’t the true Lascaux as it was closed to protect it years before (my husband was lucky enough to see it when it was open). They have made a replica but this cave is in the same area and genuine. Well worth the trip.

      Like

      • I did know that. The original cave was protected by its sheltered atmosphere for thousands of years, but when tourists started to enter and bring their outside bacteria, the fragile art began to decay. The replica lets people see certain sections of the actual cave, and exhibit proceeds support the maintenance of the actual caves. But I bet you already knew that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I did but you said it so much better than I although I didn’t know that you saw any of the actual cave. The queues were miles long even though it was out of season – we were glad to find a dig in progress that allowed us to see paintings so old it is unimaginable. The life the people of those times lived was something to wonder at and it made me want to read Clan of the Cave Bear and the other books in the series all over again.

        Like

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