Tell People: The Weekly Smile

weeklysmile1

Smile

When my Dad died I hurt but my feelings were intensifed by knowing the loss my mother felt. I said on numerous times to my husband one of the hardest things I thought would be was not having someone tell you that you looked beautiful whether you did or not because to the giver to them it was true. Seeing this video showed I was right in thinking how important it is to tell people.

In response to Trent’s Weekly smile

About Irene Waters 19 Writer Memoirist

I began my working career as a reluctant potato peeler whilst waiting to commence my training as a student nurse. On completion I worked mainly in intensive care/coronary care; finishing my hospital career as clinical nurse educator in intensive care. A life changing period as a resort owner/manager on the island of Tanna in Vanuatu was followed by recovery time as a farmer at Bucca Wauka. Having discovered I was no farmer and vowing never again to own an animal bigger than myself I took on the Barrington General Store. Here we also ran a five star restaurant. Working the shop of a day 7am - 6pm followed by the restaurant until late was surprisingly more stressful than Tanna. On the sale we decided to retire and renovate our house with the help of a builder friend. Now believing we knew everything about building we set to constructing our own house. Just finished a coal mine decided to set up in our backyard. Definitely time to retire we moved to Queensland. I had been writing a manuscript for some time. In the desire to complete this I enrolled in a post grad certificate in creative Industries which I completed 2013. Commenced a masters by research in 2014.
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37 Responses to Tell People: The Weekly Smile

  1. trentpmcd says:

    I did see the video before – it is very heart warming. And beyond the video, back to your original statement, we do need at least one person in our lives that finds us beautiful no matter what. Thanks for the smile πŸ™‚ Thinking of that, the “linky” is now up if you want to join the linkup πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sherri says:

    So true isn’t it? You make me smile Irene, thank you πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thanks, Irene. Your posts never fail to inspire me!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Interesting reactions. You can see in some of them they clearly don’t think that. This is important. Thanks for sharing.
    I think you are beautiful. Inside and out. πŸ’•

    Liked by 2 people

  5. It’s a great video but kind of sad to know that people don’t hear how beautiful they are enough of the time that it comes as a shock to hear they are beautiful.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Corina says:

    So many smiles in this one. Thank you for sharing the video!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. What a compassionate concept Shea had, and to see that (nearly) everyone smiled in response and shone with pleased surprise and inner radiance touched me deeply.
    My mom has Alzheimer’s and has lost so much memory means that she has lost all the past experiences that might sustain her as she ages. The things we remember (love, family, adventures, all the special moments of our lives that most of us remember and talk about endlessly) are the things we draw upon to give our lives continued value. My mom can’t do that. She can no longer remember. When she was younger, she was pretty, and it was so important to her to dress carefully and arrange her hair before she went out. Now she can’t do that and it’s up to her caregivers to make her presentable. She is nearly 88 and depending on her mood, getting her dressed in the morning is not always successful. When I see her I always tell her, “I love you. You look beautiful.” She beams. She answers me, “Really? Do you think so?” I can’t give her back her memories, but I can tell her in that singular moment she is beautiful and in the next singular moment, she grasps the feeling of being beautiful and she radiates joy.
    Thank you so much, Irene, for sharing this video with us. I am so sorry for the loss of your father though I know it wasn’t recent. You always touch me in important ways.

    Liked by 2 people

    • roweeee says:

      Thank you so much for sharing your story. I have two grandparents with Alzheimer’s and it can be hard for people to know what to say and you bridge the gap so beautifully. I hope not to need that as my parents age but the family history isn’t encouraging.
      xx Rowena

      Liked by 2 people

      • A very slow death, and so painful because there will be an actual death to face one day. Thanks for your lovely comment, Irene.

        Roweeee, I know exactly what you mean – the fear that you (that I) will get this disease one day. But someone pointed out to me: I only share 1/2 of my mother’s genes and I may not. My kids have even less.

        Liked by 1 person

    • And you touch me too Sharon. You are a beautiful person. The video clip touched me deeply as well and I watched it several times waiting for those faces to light it. It was beautiful to see. I’m glad you can give that joy to your Mother when she has lost so much of her identity with the loss of her memories. I’m sending you a big hug across the Pacific. It must be so hard for you watching her fade.

      Like

  8. Nancy says:

    Love it. Thanks so much for sharing. What a cool idea she had. So simple yet so meaningful .

    Liked by 1 person

  9. roweeee says:

    That video was fabulous, Irene. Thanks so much for sharing it. When you see how being told you’re beautiful uplifted all those people, it also shows what negativity does to people and tears them down. How we need to be so careful with our words, especially with children and teens.
    It is so important having that special person to share your life with and there are so many little things you share without really being conscious of them . My kids may not being talking to me but they know that I’m in the room. My big high school boy actually wanted me to pick him up from school today. Not really sure why. I think he just needed the reassurance. I’m not sure.
    It must have been very hard for your Mum.
    xx Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    • Rowena I agree it was a fabulous video. Those faces were truly beautiful when those smiles lit them up and their joy radiated out. Yes it shows how powerful the positive word is and negative ones would have the opposite effect. If you can bring your children up in the positive (which I think you are from what I see of your beautiful family) they may not sail through life but they will be happy and able to cope with what life throws at them. How is your daughter liking her new school? I’m sure you have posted about it but just haven’t managed to get around. Hopefully that will soon change. It is lovely your son wants you to pick him up and hopefully there is no problem behind it but rather that he just wants you to still be part of his life.
      It was hard on my Mum and in some ways still is even though it is 20 years since my Dad died. It is as you say, you may be in the same room but not be talking but your presence is there giving out a warmth and companionship which is full of love. The loss of that presence leaves a hole that I’m hoping will be many years before I experience it.

      Like

  10. I love this video, too.
    I value that my husband tells me I’m beautiful when I feel it the leastβ€”when I’m sleep-deprived, I haven’t washed my hair in days and I’m wearing yoga pants.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. DailyMusings says:

    What a wonderful video- and so interesting to see the reactions. It is true it is important to tell people you see them as beautiful- we don;t say it enough

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Charli Mills says:

    I thought this was to make me smile! I cried! We do need those who tell us they find us beautiful. The expressions, the reactions, such a moving video. And that you would recognize what your Mother lost. Tell her I see her pictures on your blog and I think she is the beautiful mother of a beautiful daughter!

    Liked by 1 person

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